Tag Archives: Donald Collins

Washington Sheriff Urquhart Pushed Marijuana Cover-up

TV Ads for Other States Promote Deception

When Oregon had a ballot to legalize marijuana in 2014, King County Sheriff John Urquhart appeared on TV ads claiming that legalization hadn’t created problems  in Washington.  However, on November 4, 2013, King County experienced a massive butane hash oil (BHO) fire explosion that required 100 police and fire fighters to extinguish over a 7-hour period. What a cover-up!

BHO labs are marijuana labs and today they’re far more common than meth labs. This type of fire was extreme, having completely damaged at least 10 apartment units, killing a woman.   Other sheriffs rebuked Sheriff Urquhart when he went on TV the first time.

Last year Urquhart repeated his deception, appearing in ads for Massachusetts. Colorado doesn’t coverup its pot problem so well. Continue reading

Another Young Victim of Washington’s Marijuana Policy

A stoned driver killed high school senior Cheyllyn Ranae Collinsworth, 18, on May 17, 2017.  “Chey,” as she was called, would have graduated as one of the top 25 students at Centralia High School.  She planned to attend Central Washington University and  pursue her dream of becoming an elementary school teacher.

Our condolences go out to the grieving family.  Another young person’s life on earth ended too soon.

A crash on May 17, 2017 in Thurston County  killed Cherllyn Collinsworth,18. The other driver – under the influence of marijuana – had crossed the center lane of Old Highway 99.

The driver, 25-year-old Donald Siegler, crossed the center line of Old Highway 99 at Oregon Trail Road.  He is extremely sorry and remorseful, according to his Facebook posts.

Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson, who bragged that he will defend Washington’s marijuana program should be sorry, too.   He said, “My office will use every tool at our disposal to ensure that the federal government does not undermine Washington’s successful, unified system for regulating recreational and medical marijuana.”

However, another family must live with a big hole in their hearts.

Other Marijuana Driving Victims in Washington

Cheryllyn’s death adds to a growing list of victims in Washington who are also young people.  Since Washington legalized marijuana for recreational purposes, drivers under the influence of marijuana killed these students (and perhaps others).

Cadence Boyer, 7 (killed from accident on sidewalk on Halloween)

High School Students

Jenna Farley, 14,

Kassidy Clark, 16

Luther Stroudermire, 18

Shane Ormiston, 18

Gabriel Anderson, 15

Cheyllyn Collinsworth, 18

Marijuana contributed to other deaths in Washington:

Blake Gaston, 23

Tyler Martel, 27

Stephanie Nicole Proffitt, 27

Bicyclist killed in Spokane, July 16, 2015

Jennifer Berry, 43

Donald Collins, 62

Maria Hoagland, 61, (driver had “medical” marijuana card; both marijuana and Suboxone – was “medical” marijuana for opiate addiction?

In Washington the percentage of traffic deaths involving stoned drivers is nearly the same as those involving those under the influence of alcohol, 27% vs. 29%.  It is unbelievable that any state would add to the problem of drunk driving by calling for a policy that increases stoned driving and results in a higher rate of traffic deaths.

Hamza Warsame, 16,  another young victim in Washington, died from suicide while under the influence of marijuana.   How can Washington — with so many young victims — continue to defend a marijuana policy that goes against federal law?  Read the next post for information on Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ letter to Washington’s governor.

Marijuana Deaths: 5 Killed Instantly After Pot Became Legal

Can Other States Prevent Deaths Like those in Washington?

Washington – not Colorado – was the first state to legalize weed on December 5, 2012, exactly four years ago.    Within a few weeks, five people  died—probably only because marijuana was now legal. California and Massachusetts have not figured out how to measure  stoned drivers.  Will other states that now allow pot possession face a rapid rise of deaths too?

On the morning pot was legalized, two intruders broke into the Puyallup home of a large marijuana grower.  Robbery was the motive, of course.   The owner shot and killed the masked men immediately.    So much for the claim that legalization will “free up law enforcement for more serious crimes.”    A few weeks ago, there was a similar situation in Denver, when a homeowner shot and killed a 15-year-old stealing pot from his yard.

On December 17, 2012, Scotty Rowles struck and killed pedestrian Donald Collins in Vancouver, Washington.   Rowles was not speeding, but admitted to smoking a bowl of marijuana before driving.  He spent six months in jail and is now on probation.   (Punishments for stoned driving in Washington aren’t strong enough to discourage it.)

Tyler Martel’s accident on December 7, 2012 was more deadly.   Martel left his parents’ house at 10:30 p.m.  By 3:45 a.m., the police came to the parents’ home and said that he had died.  His girlfriend, his soon-to-be fiancé, had been airlifted to Harborview Hospital Center.   Stephanie Nicole Profitt underwent many surgeries and fought to regain her life.  Her struggle ended in death on January 19, 2013.

Don’t Substitute One Dangerous Addiction for Another

Stoned driving caused three of these deaths.   Marijuana greed and jealousy inspired the shooting when two men died.  Perhaps the worst news of all is that Tyler Martel, 27, who died instantly had survived and conquered Oxycodone addiction.   He was four years clean.  He had gone through rehab, had a job and was building a new life.  At a party on that fateful night, he declined all invitations to drink.   But marijuana was now legal, and he smoked marijuana with his brother before he drove.

When people suggest that substituting opiate pain pill abuse with marijuana, remember what happened to Tyler Martel and Stephanie Proffitt.   They were not the only victims.  Timothy Lang came to Profitt’s funeral in a wheelchair.    He was one of the other drivers, and is thankful to the emergency workers who saved life.

Alex Ashley poignantly describes Tyler Martel’s battle to regain his life and the legacy of the accident.

Martel’s mother Patrice is on a mission to warn students of impaired driving.   It is counter-intuitive to suggest that any addictive substance should substitute for another addictive substance.  It’s a case where someone tried it and we know the results.

Colorado gets more publicity than Washington because many anti-pot activists live in Colorado.  The Seattle press usually covers up the downside of pot.  Colorado opened commercial marijuana six months ahead of Washington, and we’ve heard more about deaths from edibles in Colorado.

However, Washington has a slightly higher rate of stoned driving deaths than Colorado.  A stoned driver killed Rosemary Tempel four months before the vote to legalize, but the Press and police failed to report it.

One year ago, 16-year-old boy Somalian immigrant Hamza Warsame — died immediately after smoking weed.  He jumped off a balcony and fell six stories to his death in Seattle.

A warning to Massachusetts, as state legislators discuss delaying marijuana.  Government’s job is to protect its people.   The black market still thrives in Washington and also causes violence.

So many tragic marijuana-related accidents involve children.

Pedestrian Deaths Soar in Vancouver with Legal Pot

A driver was stoned when he hit 7-year old Cadence Boyer on Halloween in Vancouver, Washington. She died two days later. The car had jumped the curb when it crashed into the trick-or-treaters. The little girl’s mother and her 6-year old friend were also hospitalized, but survived. The friend’s mother ended up in intensive care and was in critical condition. It wasn’t a fun way to spend Halloween, and for Cadence there will be no more Halloweens.

The driver, 47-year old Duane C. Abbot told police that he smokes two to three grams of marijuana a day, and that he had smoked about a few hours before the crash.  Where is MADD Continue reading