Tag Archives: Addiction

Addicted to Weed? How I Suddenly Came to Realize the Truth

By Charlie Tetiyevsky, originally published, Addicted to Weed?  in The Fix on July 19, 2017

There was so much misinformation about marijuana that I was willing to doubt anything negative, even if it was backed by hard science. Then I got a brain scan.

I’d always been told that marijuana addiction was impossible, that it was a harmless herb with only medicinal properties.

I have about a month of sobriety under my belt. I still wake up most days after dreams where I spark a bowl or drop some acid thinking that sobriety is too much, that it isn’t doable, not for me. Continue reading

A Stairway to Heaven Leaves a Hole in our Hearts

The Carlos Castellanos Story

By Pam Garozzo

I am a mother with a hole in her heart, one who mourns the loss of her beloved child every day.  My son, Carlos Castellanos, died at age 23 from a drug overdose, just three weeks after walking me down the aisle at my wedding and two days before Christmas.  He had been clean from an opioid addiction for ten months and was happy, healthy and loving life.  My son had a job and was expected to get a promotion the following month, loved his girlfriend dearly and was planning to resume taking college courses.  Carlos’ dream was to become an aerospace engineer and to work for a company that would enable him to be part of the Engineers Without Borders program so that he could help others.  He was sensitive, humble, kind, love and precious to all who knew him.

Smart and witty with a great sense of humor, Carlos was very musically gifted; he played drums and guitar since the age of seven.  But he was also a perfectionist and constantly doubted himself and his abilities.   Despite having much success academically and in his musical pursuits, my son never felt worthy of the honors and accolades he received.  He also craved the love of support of his “absentee” father and often expressed anxiety about what he could do to make his dad want to spend time with him. Those feelings of inadequacy are what caused him to start smoking marijuana at age 15.  Very quickly, though, he moved on to cocaine, heroin and other drugs.  At age 18, just months before his high school graduation, Carlos suffered a grand mal seizure.  He had attended a “pharm party” the night before (where teens mix prescription drugs into a bowl and take turns ingesting them), and then took crystal meth the next morning.  I remember getting that heart-stopping call from the friend who dropped off my son at the entrance to the hospital ER and hearing the doctor tell me to contact our family so they could say goodbye to Carlos.  By the grace of God, Carlos miraculously recovered from that trauma, but he did sustain some short-term memory loss.  He vowed to stay clean and thought that he could do it on his own, without any program or support.  Within weeks however, he was quickly drawn back into the drug world.

Just before high school graduation, Carlos was arrested outside our home for carrying a quantity of marijuana that was just over the limit for a misdemeanor charge.  Since he was an adult, he received a felony conviction, which made him ineligible for a college scholarship at a prestigious university.  In Carlos’ mind, his dream to become an engineer died with the loss of that opportunity; he had been selected as one of a small group of freshman to enter the engineering program usually just open to college juniors.  So, Carlos went to his place of escape once again – drugs – this time, with a vengeance.

Hidden Dangers That I didn’t Know

My son was in and out of rehab facilities and intensive outpatient programs multiple times from age 16.  His most successful clean period was for 20 months, during which time he participated actively in AA/NA meetings and surrounded himself with those who were dedicated to addiction recovery.  He volunteered at a local rehab and facilitated recovery sessions for other young people who were fighting to stay clean like he was.  During this time, Carlos and I talked openly about his drug use.  It seems I had only known the tip of the iceberg.  I listened in horror as he told me about the types and quantities of drugs he had ingested and cried when he said that a dealer had held a gun to his chest when he didn’t have enough money to pay for the drugs he wanted to use.  He sold off almost everything that was dear to him during his periods of heavy use – his beloved guitars, computers, suitcases full of his clothes.  He lost friends who didn’t know how to deal with the significant changes in him.  He pulled away from family because he was ashamed about who he felt he had become.

When Carlos was clean and clear-headed, he would talk regretfully about the experiences that he had missed out on during his years of drug use.  For example, although he graduated from high school, he did not attend the actual ceremony and didn’t want a graduation party.  He also missed family events, such as birthday parties (he was often too high to attend or to care), an entire Christmas season spent in jail due to drug use, etc.  Carlos explained that these “voids” in his life made him very sad and depressed because he would never get that precious time back.  Although he didn’t acknowledge it for years while he was using, Carlos eventually started talking about what a major part marijuana had played in his teenage years and on the road to opioids and other mind and body-altering drugs.  He acknowledged that pot was indeed a gateway drug for him; after several months of initial use as a high school sophomore, he quickly moved to other drugs, searching for the “ultimate high.”

After relapsing again in winter 2015, my son got and stayed clean for the last 10 months of his life.  He seemed to be on a path to what he hoped to achieve and was working on his self-esteem and self-worth.   We will never know what caused him to use on December 23, 2016.  I will forever have the image of the police detective and officer who rang our doorbell that night, to inform us that Carlos had found dead in my car, from a drug overdose.  (We later learned that his drug of choice that afternoon was laced with fentanyl.)  No parent should ever have to endure the agony and heartbreak of losing a child.  Such a devastating loss crushes your soul and leaves you frozen in your tracks.  You don’t know whether you can go on without your precious loved one and it becomes an effort to do the most mundane of everyday tasks.  You spend hours and days casting your memory back to the day he was born, the day he learned how to play “Stairway to Heaven” on the guitar, the last time he hugged you and you pray that you will be able to remember his voice.

The Gaping Hole in Those of us Left Behind

What about those of us whom Carlos left behind?  My husband Mike (his stepfather) and I, Carlos’ sisters and brothers, friends and co-workers?  How are we learning to cope when a piece of our lives is missing? The photo albums that we will create as a family going forward will not be filled with pictures of our beautiful son and brother as our wedding album is now.  We will never again hear his laughter, see him drumming, singing and playing the guitar or just goofing around with his cat, Simon.  My husband, Mike and I will miss having Carlos outlive us – nothing any parent should ever have to endure.  His friends have told me that they will miss his quirky sense of humor and his willingness to go out of their way to help him; in one instance, buying a Christmas tree for a family in need.  His siblings won’t be able to make new memories with a younger brother whom they adored.

How do we go on?  How do we survive without the son, brother, friend who we lost to this terrible disease?  For my husband and me, we have chosen to do what Carlos would have done had he lived.  We tell his journey – one of an amazing human who thought about others before he thought about himself.  Who dreamed of a future without drugs, a future with hope and life and success and love.  We share the story of who Carlos was and we preserve his memories by fighting against the disease of drug abuse when he cannot.  We want everyone to know that drug addiction is most definitely a primary, chronic disease that alters who you are.  It’s a disease that is often progressive and fatal.  No one chooses to be addicted to drugs.  Carlos recounted that he often asked people “Do you think I choose this life (of addiction), with all of its pain and loss?  I want to be healthy and happy just like anyone else and to help others.”

We share Carlos’ story and urge other parents to educate themselves about the signs and symptoms of addiction.  We encourage them to get help for their loved one and for themselves.  We fight to get laws enacted to help those who struggle with this disease so that they have full access to treatment and care.  Most of all, we rest in God’s embrace, knowing that Carlos is our angel and that we will be reunited with him one day when we climb the stairway to heaven.

Pam made a video on Mother’s Day and she asks others to take action:

 

Marijuana Can’t Substitute for Pain Pills

The pot industry pushes marijuana use as a substitute for pain pills.  With a massive Public Relations effort, it uses the media to do its bidding.  However  — upon closer examination — the opiate and heroin epidemic mirror the legalization of marijuana.

The Opioid Commission headed by Governor Chris Christie should not pause one second to consider marijuana as a substitute for pain medication.  Save Our Society from Drugs asks that we petition this group not to consider marijuana as a treatment for pain.

Why So Much Chronic Pain?

Not everyone who becomes addicted to opiates started because of pain.  Those under age 35 who are dying from drug abuse at an unprecedented rate, often started abusing drugs just for fun.

People usually don’t get addicted to opiates by taking them as pain medications, according to Jon Daily, of Recovery Happens, outpatient addiction treatment centers in California.  He explains that the pain pills given after surgery and taken as prescribed, won’t produce a high for most people.  However, there’s a subset of people who respond differently and feel euphoria.  The difference for these people may be that they’re responding to unresolved issues of painful experience earlier in their lives.

Dr. Libby Stuyt, addictions psychiatrist and advisor to Parents Opposed to Pot said: “Most patients with chronic pain issues find that holding onto emotional pain from past trauma comes out in the form of physical pain.  When they work through this and are able to let go, the physical pain greatly diminishes.”

Too much medical intervention and surgery is also an issue.  Ten years ago Shannon Brownlee wrote Overtreated: How Too Much Medicine is Making us Sicker and Poorer, and now people are noticing that overtreatment create problems.

A wise Chinese doctor said:  “When a body has an imbalance, which is displayed in the form of some or other dis-ease, it will continue to display this imbalance.  If we cut out the place where that imbalance is currently occurring, then chances are, it will simply move to the next area of the body.”    It could be that unnecessary surgeries and too many surgeries contributed to chronic pain and the addiction problem.

Why People Get Addicted to Opiates

According to Jon Daily, most people in his practice begin pain pill abuse because they were already using alcohol and marijuana.  Their relationship with getting intoxicated began through these substances.  It is why Daily recommends an addiction paradigm shift away from heroin to marijuana.

Studies show that only about six percent of the population gets addicted to pain pills after surgery.   A recent study shows that states with the highest drug abuse are also the states that have legalized marijuana.

Overprescribing by doctors was a major issue in the past, but it is not the major issue today.   If pot is recommended as an alternative to avoid opioid addiction, it will probably be the same pill mill doctors who will be giving such recommendations. 

We believe the future of pain medicine is not prescribing marijuana, but in utilizing alternatives that treat the root of the pain.  Some of these techniques may need to be combined with Dialectical Behavior Therapy or Cognitive Behavior Therapy and spiritual help.   Cannabis, a psychotropic plant, is anything but “natural.”

Marijuana lobbyists have played a trick on America’s children by using the green pharmaceutical cross and pretending to be doctors.  They insist marijuana is “not a gateway” drug, but studies show otherwise.

Let’s push back on the pot industry’s promotion of marijuana as a cure-all drug and the media’s advocacy on their behalf.   Remember, “medical” marijuana was planned as a hoax.

The United States uses 80 percent of the world’s opiate pain pills.  The United States and Canada have 56% of the world’s illegal drug users.   Polydrug use is the rule today and marijuana is usually part of the drug cocktail.

Prevention and Treatment

There are many other ways to treat the opiate epidemic:  better prevention programs; mandating education in the schools; clamping down on internet sellers of these drugs, and reversing America’s constant craving to be high.

As for using drugs to treat an addiction, this practice is questionable.  What works for some will not work for others. Perhaps long-acting naltrexone (Vivitrol)  which blocks the effects of opiates, and apparently the craving, can help.  Let’s hope Governor Christie’s Commission devises some good recommendations.

True Confessions from a Marijuana Addict in Recovery

Detox Patient Hopes Cyclical Vomiting Ends

By KM,  this testimony comes from a patient in rehab who struggles from the cyclical vomiting syndrome associated with marijuana.

CHS symptoms lead me right into rehab. Morphine was the only thing that helped when they cut me off morphine I started getting pills off the street. I found cocaine helped so I was doing it everyday just to make it stop. Finally, I graduated to heroin and fetanyl and let me tell you the dope sickness plus CHS is a real treat.

I was in denial for 6 years I was actually told I had Cannabis Hyper………whatever Syndrome, CHS, but was so confused cause pot actually seemed to help.

I’m a little more than a month into rehab and I’ll tell you I already notice the difference. The problem is you’re sick for so long you forget what it’s like to live, so you keep on going back to the old ways and smoking pot. You lose all of your friends and jobs. You begin to isolate and you bond with the only thing that will bond with you and it turns out to be the drugs.

I remember screaming and crying in the shower. Begging strangers to rub my back in an emergency. Going to the psych ward because I would freak out and try and kill myself.

I know it sounds like a huge drastic thing but if you can’t quit put yourself in rehab. Or some kind of detox place. There will be doctors there to help you, and they will show you a new way of life and you won’t want to go back. Even though it has been over a month, I still get sick after I eat but the difference is undeniable. I know people don’t think they need NA and AA for pot but when it really comes down to it, marijuana is a drug and it’s ruining your life. You will lose everything with CHS. It’s only a matter of time if you haven’t yet. I know it will be a rough few months without it but I promise you it’s worth it…

I’ve even asked to be a case study so other people can get information. If it doesn’t get better after a few months maybe it’s something else. But try and rule this out and then the doctors can take a better look at you. But if you find yourself taking frequent showers, that is a pretty much dead give away. I hope you all luck and I wish I could take this pain away from you but sadly I can’t. Only you can help yourself by taking 3 months out of your life and quitting pot.

 KM

The information in this testimony backs up some of the information we shared from a previous blog article, Cannabis Hyperemesis Exposed: Toxic Side Effect of Dangerous Drug.

“…doctors find that even when cannabis use is consistent, the bouts of hyperemesis come and go, which further serves to keep the patient in denial about the connection to their drug use.”

“The most prominent cases are among long-term users that started using the drug at a very early age and have used daily for over 10 years…”

“Symptoms reported in a Current Psychiatry article include cyclic vomiting, abdominal pain, nausea, gastric pain and compulsive hot bathing or showers to ease pain.  Frequent bathing and vomiting can also lead to dehydration and excessive thirst. Mild fever, weight loss, and a drop in blood pressure upon standing are other symptoms.”.”

“Complete cessation of marijuana use is the only known cure for Cannabis Hyperemesis Syndrome.”

In San Diego, Dr. Ronnet Lev’s  explained the vomiting during a press conference against Proposition 64.